South Dakota House Speaker plans delay in AG impeachment

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) - Top South Dakota lawmakers announced a proposal on Tuesday to delay evaluating whether the state's attorney general should be impeached until the conclusion of the criminal case against him for hitting and killing a man with his car.

House Speaker Spencer Gosch, a Republican, released a ...

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Award-Winning Reporter To Sue Gretchen Whitmer Over Nursing Home COVID Data

Michigan’s Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer got some bad news this week when a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist announced plans to sue her for the release of COVID-19 nursing home data.

Reporter Says He’s Preparing Lawsuit Against Whitmer

Seasoned reporter Charlie LeDuff revealed on Twitter that he is teaming up with Mackinac Center, a Michigan-based free market think tank, to file a lawsuit against Whitmer.

“We are preparing a lawsuit against Gov. Whitmer of Michigan,” LeDuff wrote. “She refuses to turn over COVID death data and accurate nursing home numbers to the public. All the way to the Supreme Court, Madam.”

 

“The public has a right to know,” LeDuff told Fox News. “Above all, the public has a need to know. We shut down the entire economy, we interrupted our children’s lives, all in the name of protecting the most vulnerable.”

“We now know this was the institutionalized elderly. If we could not protect them, at the very least we deserve an explanation from Madam Governor.”

“If there’s something more to it than that, let’s say gross incompetence or gross negligence or gross press conferences designed to cover the facts, then she needs to answer for it. As I’ve always said, the power lies with the people, not the political parties,” he continued.

Whitmer’s office declined to comment when contacted by Fox.

Related: Gretchen Whitmer Slips Up – Contradicts Message Of Support For Michigan Businesses By Sending Mailer Printed In Wisconsin

Republicans Demand Investigation Into Whitmer And Nursing Homes

This comes after multiple Republican state lawmakers sent a letter to Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel and acting U.S. Attorney General Monty Wilkinson calling for a “full investigation” into Whitmer’s handling of nursing homes during the coronavirus pandemic.

These Republican legislators cited “discrepancies” in the data surrounding deaths and cases “in the state’s long-term care facilities.”

“It has now come to our attention that these reporting errors have likely not been resolved,” the Republicans claimed, adding that Whitmer’s “regional hub policy put patients with and without COVID-19 in the same facilities” and the decision to do so “may have exacerbated the death toll in those facilities.”

Related: Gretchen Whitmer Humiliated After Billboard Names Her As ‘Indiana Businessperson Of The Year’

Andrew Cuomo In Hot Water As Well

This comes as New York’s Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo is facing calls of impeachment for his withholding of data on nursing home resident deaths. This is only one of the problems Cuomo is facing, as multiple former aides have accused him fo sexual harassment.

This piece was written by James Samson on March 2, 2021. It originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

Read more at LifeZette:
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Rush Limbaugh Is Laid To Rest At Cemetery In St. Louis, Missouri
Prominent Baptist Pastor Says Evangelical Support For GOP Is Conditional

The post Award-Winning Reporter To Sue Gretchen Whitmer Over Nursing Home COVID Data appeared first on The Political Insider.

Tanden withdrawal absolves Murkowski of difficult decision

Sen. Lisa Murkowski took her time deliberating the fate of Neera Tanden's bid to become White House budget chief. And while she mulled it over, the White House removed Tanden's nomination from purgatory.

The news that President Joe Biden withdrew Tanden's nomination, at Tanden's request, ground to a halt days of discussions between Murkowski and the White House over a potential path to save her nomination. As of Tuesday, the moderate Alaska Republican's vote was "fluid," said Senate Republican Whip John Thune (R-S.D.). Murkowski met with Tanden on Monday and said she has more follow-up questions.

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and several swing-vote Republicans announced opposition to Tanden, in part because of her frequent Twitter attacks in the past, making Murkowski the deciding vote. It's clear that Tanden was not high on her prospects of winning over the Alaska Republican or a pair of undecided Senate Democrats.

"It now seems clear that there is no path forward to gain confirmation, and I do not want continued consideration of my nomination to be a distraction from your other priorities," Tanden said in a letter to Biden that came after the White House spent more than a week trying to salvage her nomination.

And though Murkowski never publicly stated how she would vote on Tanden before the withdrawal, Murkowski at a minimum asserted her importance in today's 50-50 Senate. Her long consideration of the nomination and dialogue with the Biden administration shows how critical Murkowski's vote will be in the months ahead in a narrowly divided Washington. Democrats will need 60 votes to most things, and Murkowski will be top of mind as they go forward.

Thune said Murkowski had bigger concerns about her home state as she weighed her vote on Tanden.

"She's got concerns about the economy in Alaska. And there are some policies that the administration has taken already that are very harmful to Alaska. And she's trying to have a conversation with them about things they can do to help improve the economic outlook," Thune said on Tuesday after visiting with Murkowski this week.

Murkowski said on Tuesday that she spent much of meeting with Tanden explaining her state's unique situation. The senator observed that Tanden is "not familiar with Alaska."

"I’m taking more of my free time and not so free time to ensure that everybody in this administration ... understands the economic situation, understands how the Alaska economy is situated right now," Murkowski said. She said she was not asking for any special accommodations for her or her state.


Neera Tanden testifies during a Senate Committee on the Budget hearing on Capitol Hill.

Murkowski spoke for a long period with Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska) on Monday evening; both have denounced the Biden administration's pause on new oil and gas exploration on federal lands. She's also spoken several times this week to Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.), a close Biden associate.

While Murkowski deliberated, the confirmation process for Tanden stalled. Committee votes on her nomination were postponed until there's at least a path to getting her 50 votes on the floor, with Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont undecided.

If Murkowski joined all 49 Democratic caucus members other than Manchin, Tanden's nomination could have in theory prevailed — and the Republican would have handed the Biden White House a major victory.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell encouraged his conference to stand together against Tanden, and Murkowski is up for reelection in 2022. McConnell is supporting her reelection bid, even after she voted to convict former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial. Joining Biden and the Democrats would have amounted to a snub of the GOP leader.

What Biden could have given Murkowski in terms of her home state's energy industry is unclear. Backtracking on early moves to pause drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and temporarily halt new lease sales for oil and gas drilling on federal lands would mean breaking major campaign promises for Biden.

Murkowski noted in a January statement that while she supports moving toward “clean, sustainable energy” that “inhibiting Alaska’s resource development will only hamper our ability to recover” from the ongoing pandemic that has ravaged the state.

Marianne LeVine and Anthony Adragna contributed reporting.

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Who is Cuomo’s lieutenant governor? Kathy Hochul thrust into spotlight amid governor’s mounting scandals

If embattled three-term New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is forced to resign or is removed through impeachment, Lt. Gov Kathy Hochul would make history.

Former CIA Director John Brennan Is ‘Embarrassed To Be A White Male’ – Here’s What He Should Be Embarrassed About

On Monday, former CIA Director John Brennan said in an interview that he is “increasingly embarrassed to be a white male” in reaction to investigations into the Capitol Hill riots on January 6.

Brennan made his bizarre racial comments during an MSNBC panel, where he serves as an intelligence analyst for the news outlet.

RELATED: Joy Behar Says If Trump Runs For President In 2024, It Will Be From Rikers Island Prison

Brennan: ‘I’m Increasingly Embarrassed To Be A White Male These Days’

On the panel, Former Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill told host MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace, “I have never seen so many whiny white men calling themselves victims as I saw over the weekend at (the Conservative Political Action Conference)]. I mean, these are all people who think they have a huge grievance from a position of significant privilege.”

McCaskill was asked for her take on Antifa and other left-wing radicals being blamed by some Republicans for the riots on January 6.

McCaskill replied, “It has really become the norm for the new Republican Party that lying is just peachy keen and I can’t believe the majority of America is gonna accept that, especially if we remain vigilant about pointing out what the facts are.”

Wallace then turned to Brennan for comments on this issue.

“Well, I must say, to Claire’s point, I’m increasingly embarrassed to be a white male these days,” Brennan replied,

Wallace laughed. Brennan added, “when I see (what) my other white males (are) saying.”

“It just shows that with very few exceptions like Mitt Romney, Liz Cheney, Adam Kinzinger, there are so few Republicans in Congress who value truth, honesty, and integrity, and so they’ll continue to gaslight the country the way that Donald Trump did,” Brennan said.

Many of us recall that Democrats sang a very different tune about Mitt Romney and the Cheneys before Donald Trump’s arrival on the political scene.

The former CIA director continued, “And the fact that this had such security and safety implications for the American public and for the members of Congress, again, as Claire said, it is just a disgusting display of craven politics that really should have no place in the United States in 2021.”

Isn’t that cute. You know who should have no place in politics, or polite society for that matter, in the United States in 2021?

John Brennan.

Brennan Should Be Ashamed To Be John Brennan

Notice that the few anti-Trump Republicans in Congress who Brennan believes “value truth, honesty, and integrity” are all pro-war George W. Bush-Dick Cheney-style Republicans, including the former VP’s own daughter, Congresswoman Liz Cheney.

Senator Rand Paul, who has battled these hawks – especially Liz Cheney – his entire political career laid out clearly in February 2020 what Brennan should be ashamed of.

When Paul opposed impeaching Trump, Brennan said of Paul, “He typifies the worst of (Trump’s) craven enablers. Any Senator excusing this dangerous behavior makes a mockery of public service.”

That’s when Sen. Paul let Brennan have it.

RELATED: Hyatt Hotels Targeted By Left For Hosting CPAC – Hyatt Responds: Conservatives Have Right To ‘Express Their Views’

America Should Be Embarrassed Of John Brennan

“You want to know what’s a mockery of public service, John?” Paul shot back. “Killing 500 people outside of any judicial system. Drone strikes on American citizens. Approving British spies to present a dossier of lies paid for by Hillary. Lying to Congress.”

“Your shame alone should shut you up,” Paul added.

Overall, the pro-Trump libertarian-leaning senator was referring to Brennan’s neoconservative approach to national “security,” extra-judicial drone killings, and involvement with the infamous “Steele dossier” that kicked off Trump’s first impeachment.

The liberal media highlighted Brennan’s role as Obama’s “drone warrior” and “Obama’s drone-master.”

They even called him out for his wild 2011 claim that his drone strikes hadn’t caused “a single collateral death.”

If you recall, Obama had a secret “kill list,” which Brennan’s drone strikes helped to carry out.

The New York Times reported that President Trump ended Brennan’s “$1 billion secret CIA war in Syria,” in which Brennan and company armed “Syrian rebels,” with weapons falling into the hands of Al Qaeda allies.

At his confirmation hearing to be CIA Director, Brennan told Congress he knew about the CIA’s torture program and did nothing to stop it.

Many people don’t remember, but multiple mainstream outlets called on John Brennan to be fired for lying to Congress.

Bob Woodward reported that Brennan endorsed the infamous “Steele dossier” that led to the years-long Russia collusion hoax.

So the former CIA head is embarrassed of being a “white male.”

The entire country should be embarrassed of John Brennan.

The post Former CIA Director John Brennan Is ‘Embarrassed To Be A White Male’ – Here’s What He Should Be Embarrassed About appeared first on The Political Insider.

Morning Digest: These are the top 10 state supreme court battles of the coming cycle

The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar.

Leading Off

State Supreme Courts: In a new story, Daily Kos Elections' Stephen Wolf looks state-by-state at the supreme court elections in 2021-2022 where progressives or conservatives could gain majorities or make major inroads. The federal judiciary grew ever more hostile to voting rights during the Trump era, and the right-wing majority on the U.S. Supreme Court has refused to curtail partisan gerrymanders designed to entrench one-party rule. But at the same time, state courts such as Pennsylvania's have started striking down these gerrymanders and issuing their own decisions defending voting access.

Crucially, these decisions have relied on protections found in state constitutions, meaning that they're insulated from U.S. Supreme Court review (at least for the time being). Almost every state constitution, in fact, offers similar protections—the issue is who's interpreting them. Unlike federal judges, most state supreme court justices are elected to their posts, and while the almost uniquely American practice of electing judges creates serious problems for judicial impartiality, it nevertheless presents progressives with the opportunity to replace conservative ideologues with more independent-minded jurists.

Campaign Action

​With 10 major states up for grabs over the next two years, progressives have the chance to flip Ohio's Supreme Court, gain a more solid majority in Montana, and make gains that could set them up to flip conservative-heavy courts in Georgia, Texas, and Virginia later this decade. Meanwhile, Republicans could take control of Democratic-leaning courts in Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and North Carolina. Elections in these states could have major implications for efforts to constrain gerrymandering and protect the right to vote over the next decade.

Senate

AL-Sen, AL-Gov: Lt. Gov. Will Ainsworth, whose name had come up as a possible candidate for Alabama's open Senate seat, announced on Friday that he would not join the GOP primary. However, while Ainsworth did not mention next year's race for governor, he did say in a statement that he believes "that God's plan currently calls for me to continue leading on the state, not federal, level of government"—a hint that he could instead run for that post. The current incumbent, Republican Kay Ivey, could seek another term but hasn't yet announced her plans and may, at age 76, opt to retire.

OH-Sen, OH-Gov: Republican Rep. Warren Davidson said over the weekend that he's considering a bid for Ohio's open Senate race and also suggested he could primary Gov. Mike DeWine. In an interview with Fox at CPAC, Davidson criticized DeWine for his "overbearing" approach to fighting the pandemic and said he should have behaved more like Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. Of course, it's one thing to take jabs at an incumbent unpopular with conservatives when in the most friendly possible environment; it's quite a lot further to challenge him in an actual campaign.

Governors

MA-Gov: Democrat Joe Curtatone announced on Monday that he would not seek a sixth term this fall as mayor of Somerville, a city of 81,000 located just north of Boston, and he once again did not rule out a bid for governor in 2022. Curtatone said his decision was not a "political calculus to a calendar or timeline," adding, "I'm not even thinking about what I may or may want to do."

Back in December, the conservative Boston Herald reported that Curtatone was mulling over a bid against Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, who has not yet revealed his own plans. While Curtatone still hasn't publicly expressed interest, though, one of his longtime advisors did say the mayor was thinking about it. Consultant Mark Horan, who acknowledged that it would have been "extremely difficult" for Curtatone to seek a promotion while also running for reelection, said of a potential gubernatorial run, "It certainly makes sense that he is considering it."

NY-Gov: Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo will face an independent investigation into charges that he sexually harassed female members of his staff after a second aide, former health policy staffer Charlotte Bennett, accused him of repeatedly asking her invasive and unwanted questions about her sex life. Following Bennet’s allegations, a third woman, Anna Ruch, said on Monday that Cuomo made an unsought advance on her at a wedding, grabbing her face and asking if he could kiss her before she was able to pull away.

Bennett, who is 25, revealed to the New York Times's Jesse McKinley that the 63-year-old Cuomo, whom she served as an executive assistant, did not touch her but asked her questions like whether "she was romantically involved," "was monogamous in her relationships," "believed if age made a difference in relationships" and "had ever been with an older man." According to Bennett, Cuomo told her "he's fine with anyone above the age of 22." She told McKinley, "I understood that the governor wanted to sleep with me, and felt horribly uncomfortable and scared."

Bennett contemporaneously documented her encounters in text messages with friends and family members. She also reported them to Cuomo's chief of staff in June and was soon transferred to a new position advising on health policy, explaining that she chose not to press for an investigation because she was happy with her new post and "wanted to move on." However, Bennett left her job in November, saying, of Cuomo, "His presence was suffocating. I was thinking that I could recover and have distance but that is so naïve."

Following the Times report on Friday, which came just two days after another former aide, Lindsey Boylan, accused Cuomo of fostering a hostile workplace and kissing her on the mouth without her consent, top Democrats across the state immediately demanded an inquiry. Cuomo sought to head off these demands on Saturday by trying to hand-pick his own investigator, former federal Judge Barbara Jones—a move that was met with instant derision given Jones' close ties to a former top Cuomo aide, Steven Cohen.

In a rare climb-down reflecting his precarious position, Cuomo quickly reversed course on Sunday and asked state Attorney General Tish James and Chief Judge Janet DiFiore to jointly name an independent attorney to investigate the allegations. James, however, instantly shot down that proposal as well, saying that her office alone has the legal authority to handle the matter. (And though James didn't mention it, DiFiore was appointed to her position leading New York's highest court, the Court of Appeals, by Cuomo.)

Remarkably, Cuomo backed down a second time later that same day and said he would refer the matter outright to James, which he did the following day. James promised to hire an outside law firm to lead the probe and pledged she would "oversee a rigorous and independent investigation."

Cuomo's response to the substance of Bennett's charges has also differed markedly from how he reacted to Boylan's accusations, which he simply denied entirely. On Sunday, in a statement that referenced Bennett but not Boylan, Cuomo said, "I now understand that my interactions may have been insensitive or too personal and that some of my comments, given my position, made others feel in ways I never intended," and added a no-pology: "To the extent anyone felt that way, I am truly sorry about that."

Bennett rejected Cuomo's remarks as insufficient on Monday, saying in a statement that the governor "has refused to acknowledge or take responsibility for his predatory behavior." She also offered encouragement to other women who might come forward.

Whether or not in response to Bennett’s entreaty, Ruch did just that. On Monday, she told the New York Times that, after she thanked the governor for making a toast on behalf of her newly married friends, Cuomo swiftly placed his hand on her bare lower back. A friend photographed the ensuing moments, in which Cuomo placed both hands on Ruch’s cheeks and, says Ruch, asked, “Can I kiss you?” Ruch’s friend says Cuomo kissed Ruch on the cheek as she removed herself from his grasp. A Cuomo spokesperson “did not directly address Ms. Ruch’s account,” says the Times, only directing reporters back to the Sunday statement described above.

While a number of prominent Democrats have said Cuomo should resign if James' investigation inculpates him, a growing chorus has called for him to leave office immediately. A telling example came from Rep. Kathleen Rice, who tweeted, “The Governor must resign” shortly after the Times published Ruch’s story. In 2010, Rice was Cuomo’s preferred candidate to succeed him as attorney general, though she lost the Democratic primary to Eric Schneiderman.

If Cuomo were to leave office early, he would be succeeded by Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, a former congresswoman who is serving her second term as Cuomo’s number two.

House

NC-11: In a new report from BuzzFeed, two more women, Caitlin Coulter and Leah Petree, have publicly accused freshman Republican Rep. Madison Cawthorn of sexually harassing them while they attended Patrick Henry College in 2016 and 2017. Previously, three women (including two by name) came forward in the summer of 2020 to charge Cawthorn with similar acts both before and during his time at Patrick Henry.

Several other students also told BuzzFeed that Cawthorn had developed a reputation for predatory behavior despite his brief enrollment at the school (he was there for just over a semester), and two dorm leaders also confirmed that they'd warned women about him.

NJ-02: Democratic Assemblyman Vince Mazzeo has announced he'll run for a competitive state Senate seat that's open this fall due to a Republican retirement, which probably takes him out of the running for a challenge to Republican Rep. Jeff Van Drew. Win or lose in November, it'd be unlikely that Mazzeo would want to immediately turn around and run another tough race.

OH-16: With the support of his old boss, former Donald Trump aide Max Miller has entered the GOP primary against Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, who was one of 10 House Republican who voted to impeach Trump in January. Miller, a Marine Corps reservist, hails from a family of prominent Jewish philanthropists in the Cleveland neighborhood of Shaker Heights but only recently moved into Gonzalez's 16th District, which lies to the west, south, and east of the area where Miller grew up (yes, it's that hideously gerrymandered).

The announcement makes Miller the first notable Republican to join the race, but former state Rep. Christina Hagan has also hinted at her interest. However, she's said she might instead choose to seek Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan's 13th District, depending on how redistricting turns out.

TX-06: Republican Brian Harrison, who served as chief of staff to former Trump Health and Human Services chief Alex Azar during his disastrous handling of the COVID pandemic, announced Monday that he could compete in the May 1 special election to succeed the late GOP Rep. Ron Wright. Politico wrote last month of the now-candidate, "In the West Wing, a handful of his detractors derisively referred to Harrison as 'the dog breeder'—a reference to the labradoodle-breeding family business that he helped run prior to joining the Trump administration." More on that here.

Meanwhile, The Hill reports that former Trump spokesperson Katrina Pierson also plans to run. The filing deadline is Wednesday, so we'll have a full-line up for the all-party primary very soon.

WY-AL: State Rep. Chuck Gray just filed paperwork with the FEC ahead of a possible primary challenge to Republican Rep. Liz Cheney, though he has yet to speak publicly about his interest. Gray's name surfaced last month when a poll for Donald Trump's super PAC included him. His Twitter bio only describes him as a member of the legislature, not a congressional candidate, though his feed is mostly filled with attacks on Cheney. Another GOP lawmaker, state Sen. Anthony Bouchard, is already running.

Legislatures

Special Elections: Tuesday brings the busiest special election night of the year so far, with three races on deck in Alabama, California, and Connecticut.

AL-SD-26: This Democratic Montgomery-based seat became vacant when former Sen. David Burkette resigned last year. Burkette did not cite a reason for his resignation at the time, but was arrested and sentenced to a year of probation just a few weeks later because of a campaign finance violation.

Democratic state Rep. Kirk Hatcher will take on Republican William Green, a minister. Alabama is a difficult state to wrangle data from, so we don't have presidential results for this district. Based on prior results for races here, though, this is a strongly Democratic district. Burkette twice defeated Republican DJ Johnson here in 2018; once in a special election by an 89-10 spread and again later in the year in the regular election 80-20.

Republicans have a 26-7 edge in this chamber with this and one other seat vacant.

CA-SD-10: This South Los Angeles-area seat became vacant when former Democratic Sen. Holly Mitchell was elected to the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors last year. Three Democrats and two Republicans (plus two non-major party candidates) are vying to replace Mitchell in this strongly Democratic seat that backed Joe Biden 84-12 in 2020, according to data from Los Angeles County.

The Democrats are Assemblymember Sydney Kamlager, Culver City Council Member Daniel Lee, and Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles President Cheryl Turner, while businessman Joe Lisuzzo and business consultant Tiffani Jones are the Republicans. Community organizer Ernesto Huerta is representing the Peace and Freedom Party and Army veteran Renita Duncan is running without a party affiliation as an independent candidate.

Unlike other California elections, where the top two candidates advance to the next round even if one candidate wins a majority, special elections can be won in the first round if the leading candidate takes more than 50%. If no candidate does, though, a runoff will be held on May 4.

Democrats currently hold a 30-9 supermajority in this chamber, with just this seat vacant.

CT-SD-27: This seat located in Stamford became vacant when former Democratic Sen. Carlo Leon resigned to join the administration of Gov. Ned Lamont. The candidates for this race were selected by their parties, and Democrats nominated state Rep. Patricia Miller while Republicans tapped attorney Joshua Esses.

This is a safely blue district that Hillary Clinton won 66-30 in 2016. Democrats control this chamber 23-12, with just this seat vacant.

Mayors

Boston, MA Mayor: Republican Gov. Charlie Baker signed legislation on Friday that would avert a special election in the event that Mayor Marty Walsh resigns before March 5 to become U.S. secretary of labor. The regularly scheduled nonpartisan primary for a four-year term will still take place in September, and the two candidates with the most votes will compete in the November general election.

Dem Senator Hirono Blames Trump Rhetoric For Alleged Rise In Anti-Asian Hate Crimes

Senator Mazie Hirono (D-HI) spoke out on Sunday to blame former President Donald Trump’s rhetoric on COVID-19 for an alleged spike in anti-Asian hate crimes.

“You were the first Asian-American woman elected to the Senate, a striking surge in anti-Asian hate crimes here in America. Why is this happening, and what should be done about it?” asked ABC anchor George Stephanopoulos.

Hirono Responds

“It’s happening because we didn’t have leadership at the top, starting from President Trump calling it the China virus and the Kung flu and all of that, which apparently it unleashed this kind of targeted hate crimes among Asian-Americans, and the increase is dramatic,” Hirono replied.

“Just last week in New York, a person who was just walking down the street got knifed. He is in serious condition,” she added. “Soon thereafter, four people walking in New York were knifed. One died. In California, you have incidents of 90-year-old people being knocked down, attacked. That person died.”

Related: Democratic Senator Hirono Reveals Real Goal Behind Trump Impeachment Effort

Hirono Praises Biden

“So I’m glad that Joe Biden, unlike Trump, has put this issue forward through his executive memorandum, which by the way contains many of the provisions that I put in a resolution that I tried to pass last year condemning targeted hate crimes against Asian-Americans,” she continued.

“The idea is for the attorney general, soon-to-be new attorney general, to work with community groups to prevent and prosecute these kinds of hate crimes,” Hirono said.

“So it’s being recognized by President Biden and that, you know, leadership throughout our country should condemn in no uncertain terms, when you have Asian-Americans afraid to walk down the street for the fear of being knifed, this is an issue that needs to be dealt with,” she added.

Related: Ted Cruz Mocks Dem Mazie Hirono At Senate Hearing: ‘You’re Welcome To Say Something Negative About Antifa Right Now’

Hirono Addresses Cuomo Claims

In this same interview, Hirono called for an independent investigation into the sexual harassment claims that were made against New York’s Democratic Governor George Stephanopoulos.

“The proper response for any of these kind of allegations of reprehensible, inexcusable behavior is to listen to the — mainly women who come forward … and then to do the appropriate investigation and corroboration of the allegations,” Hirono said.  

“In the case of Gov. Cuomo, it seems to me that the New York attorney general would be the independent entity to conduct such an investigation,” she added. 

This piece was written by James Samson on March 2, 2021. It originally appeared in LifeZette and is used by permission.

Read more at LifeZette:
Fox News Back In The Fold
Rush Limbaugh Is Laid To Rest At Cemetery In St. Louis, Missouri
Cuomo Admits Virus Scam

The post Dem Senator Hirono Blames Trump Rhetoric For Alleged Rise In Anti-Asian Hate Crimes appeared first on The Political Insider.